NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

David Swensen speaks in 2012 at an event honoring Jack Bogle, who created the first index fund. Like Bogle, Swensen was a champion of the everyday investor who he thought should invest in low-fee index funds and steer clear of actively managed mutual funds with higher fees. Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

David Swensen, The Greatest Investor You Maybe Never Heard Of, Leaves Powerful Legacy

Swensen made billions for Yale and revolutionized the way Universities and other nonprofits invest. And he strove to teach everyday people how to invest without getting fleeced by Wall Street.

David Swensen, The Greatest Investor You Maybe Never Heard Of, Leaves Powerful Legacy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994794562/995016935" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Wearing a mask and a face shield to curb the spread of the coronavirus, 10-year-old Jade Chan Puc writes in her workbook during the first day of class in Hecelchakán, Campeche state, Mexico, on April 19. On average, schools in Latin America and the Caribbean were closed longer than any in any other region, according to UNICEF. Martin Zetina/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Zetina/AP

How Latin America's Kids Suffer From World's Longest COVID School Closings

Education was already a problem area in much of Latin America. But the coronavirus made a bad situation worse, writes journalist Alejandro Tarre.

Scientists once compared the abilities of humans versus canines in tracking a trail of chocolate essential oil laid down in an open field. Though the humans weren't nearly as proficient as the dogs, they did get better with practice. Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

toggle caption
Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop

Will My Sense Of Smell Ever Return? Olfactory Insights From COVID And Beyond

COVID-19 has renewed interest in a key way humans perceive the world. A reporter who hasn't been able to tell the scent of a rose from a sweaty gym shoe for decades takes heart in the latest science.

Mrs. Mallard returned to Steve Stuttard's ninth story balcony this year to lay her eggs. Stuttard kept watch and helped make sure that all 11 ducklings made it down to the water where they happily swam away with Mrs. Mallard. Emma Newman/YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Newman/YouTube

Duck Tales: Man Uses Naval Skills To Get 11 Ducklings Down 9 Stories

Operation Mallard 2 is complete after Steve Stuttard helped Mrs. Mallard get her 11 ducklings down nine stories from his apartment balcony to a nearby canal.

Duck Tales: Man Uses Naval Skills To Get 11 Ducklings Down 9 Stories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994697325/994850183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nardo Samson posing with granddaughter Kiara Bautista, May 2017. Jan Daniel Belmonte hide caption

toggle caption
Jan Daniel Belmonte

Looking For A Bed For Daddy Lolo: Inside The Philippines' COVID Crisis

In Manila, a family unites to secure care and treatment for Daddy Lolo, their beloved grandfather. Along the way, they witness just how ill-equipped the country is to manage COVID.

Looking For A Bed For Daddy Lolo: Inside The Philippines' COVID Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994187886/994394226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Orion Rummler; Imara Jones; Kate Sosin Orion Rummler, Courtesy of Axios; Imara Jones; Kate Sosin hide caption

toggle caption
Orion Rummler, Courtesy of Axios; Imara Jones; Kate Sosin

Amid Wave Of Anti-Trans Bills, Trans Reporters Say 'Telling Our Own Stories' Is Vital

Three trans journalists spoke with NPR about their experience covering their community, anti-trans legislation and the idea of objectivity in the media industry.

Amid Wave Of Anti-Trans Bills, Trans Reporters Say 'Telling Our Own Stories' Is Vital

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993838090/993934350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Part of a collage of images of Scott Simon reporting for NPR News from Cuba, San Salvador and Iraq. Caroline Richard Simon hide caption

toggle caption
Caroline Richard Simon

As NPR Turns 50, Scott Simon's View From Behind The Microphone

As NPR celebrates 50 years on the air, host Scott Simon reflects on how the network has grown, and his time travelling the world, covering wars, famines, elections and more.

Opinion: As NPR Turns 50, Scott Simon's View From Behind The Microphone

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994375177/994996967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shaman Jeong Soon-deok holds up a fan, bells and other ceremonial objects during an initiation ceremony at a temple in Seoul. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Shamanism Endures In Both Koreas — But In The North, Shamans Risk Arrest Or Worse

Combining elements of animism, ancestor worship and folk religion, shamanism remains popular on both sides of the border. But it's illegal in the North, and some who practice it have been executed.

Shamanism Endures In Both Koreas — But In The North, Shamans Risk Arrest Or Worse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/973254913/993141033" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Israeli security forces deploy next to the Dome of the Rock mosque amid clashes with Palestinian protesters at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem on Friday. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images

Israeli-Palestinian Clashes Escalate In Ramadan Night Violence At Al-Aqsa Mosque

Palestinian medics said more than 200 Palestinians were injured after Israeli police in riot gear confronted Muslim worshippers. Israel said six police officers were injured.

A bin full of discarded catalytic converters at AB CatTech in Burlington, Wis. Chuck Quirmbach/WUWM hide caption

toggle caption
Chuck Quirmbach/WUWM

There's Big Money In Stolen Catalytic Converters

WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee's NPR

Catalytic converters on the underside of vehicles help reduce emissions. But rising prices for some metals has led to a jump in them being stolen — and some unique theft prevention methods.

There's Big Money In Stolen Catalytic Converters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994656425/994657346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A picture of George Floyd hangs on a fence barrier that surrounds the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on March 30. The Justice Department is bringing criminal charges against former police officer Derek Chauvin for allegedly violating Floyd's rights and using excessive force in restraining him. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Justice Department Brings Federal Criminal Charges Against Derek Chauvin, 3 Others

Prosecutors accuse the former officer and others of using excessive force and violating George Floyd's rights. The rare federal charges follow state charges in a trial in which Chauvin was convicted.

In a year where loss, grief, technology and identity have been at the forefront of the national conversation, the budding trend of email opt-outs are for many both a welcome change and a sign of what may lie ahead. Jordan Kirchner hide caption

toggle caption
Jordan Kirchner

In A Grief-Filled Year, Brands From Etsy To Pandora Let You Skip Mother's Day Emails

The small but growing trend is seen as a welcome acknowledgement of people who are grieving, as well as a sign that email marketing is becoming increasingly personalized and socially conscious.

This depiction of the coronavirus shows the main mutation sites of the South African coronavirus variant B.1.351 and the UK variant B.1.1.7. The virus spike protein (red) is bound to the surface of a human cell (blue). Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Gaertner/Science Source

A Semi-Controversial Theory About The Coronavirus Variant In India

An evolutionary biologist in Belgium found that the variant from the U.K. "had a transmission advantage." When Tom Wenseleers looks at early data on the variant in India, he has a feeling of deja vu.

Is The Variant From India The Most Contagious Coronavirus Mutant On The Planet?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994710459/994786709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Maricopa County ballots cast in the 2020 general election are examined and recounted Thursday by contractors hired by the Republican-led Arizona Senate. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

In Response To Justice Dept., Arizona Senate Says Plan To Canvass Voters Is On Hold

KJZZ

The U.S. Justice Department had said that plans for door-to-door canvassing, as part of the controversial GOP-led election review, may violate federal laws aimed at preventing voter intimidation.

Pfizer-BioNTech is seeking the Food and Drug Administration's approval for its COVID-19 vaccine, with the goal of getting the agency's green light "in the coming months." Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Pfizer Seeks Full FDA Approval For COVID-19 Vaccine

The agency's approval of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — shown to be 95% effective — would go beyond the speedier and less rigorous emergency use authorization currently granted to the vaccine.

A French omelet, unlike its diner-style counterpart, is rolled, not folded, and include very little filling like vegetables and meats. Steve Klise/America's Test Kitchen hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Klise/America's Test Kitchen

For Mother's Day, Roll Up A French-Style Omelet As A Way To Say 'I Love You'

Jack Bishop of America's Test Kitchen describes the French omelet as "a nice way of saying 'Mom, Happy Mother's Day. I love you." It's an elegant alternative to its folded diner-style counterpart.

For Mother's Day, Roll Up A French-Style Omelet As A Way To Say 'I Love You'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993572000/994539633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"We're tracking it. We're following it as closely as we can. It's just a little too soon right now to know where it's going to go or what if anything can be done about that," a U.S. Space Command spokesman told reporters. Guo Wenbin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Guo Wenbin/AP

What Goes Up Must Come Down — Including A Giant Chinese Rocket Plunging Toward Earth

U.S. Space Command says the exact entry point into the Earth's atmosphere cannot be pinpointed until hours before its reentry, which is expected sometime around May 8.

When Jade Rone, left, was first taken into Stacia Parker's care, she kept her feelings to herself. At their StoryCorps interview in Philadelphia in June 2019, Parker told her, "I was trying to develop your voice." Ava Ahmadbeigi for StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Ava Ahmadbeigi for StoryCorps

'Searching For A Mom': A Foster Daughter Finds One – And A Voice Of Her Own

When Jade Rone was placed in Stacia Parker's care, she kept her feelings to herself: "I just felt like I didn't matter." But Parker had different expectations for her.

'Searching For A Mom': A Foster Daughter Finds One – And A Voice Of Her Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994142032/994539639" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A U.S. Capitol Police officer stands guard outside the Capitol ahead of the inauguration for President Biden on Jan. 20. Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images

'The Worst I've Seen': Capitol Police Face Scrutiny For Lack Of Transparency

Critics say the Capitol Police's history of secrecy contributed to the failure to prevent the Capitol riot. Unlike many departments, the agency is exempt from releasing records like bodycam footage.

'The Worst I've Seen': Capitol Police Face Scrutiny For Lack Of Transparency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994320154/994812304" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Right out of college Anita Ramaswamy was hired for her dream job as an analyst at a big bank on Wall Street. She frequently worked until midnight, including during the pandemic. Courtney Pedroza for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Courtney Pedroza for NPR

'Absolute Meltdown': Wall Street's Work Till You Drop Culture Under Attack

Burnout in investment banking has been a problem, but the pandemic has made it worse. A handful of firms are responding by offering extra perks and more pay. But more money may not be the answer.

A broken cat scratching post poses a problem for Goodwill Donation Attendant Antonio Semiglia in Westbrook, Maine. Heather Steeves hide caption

toggle caption
Heather Steeves

Goodwill Doesn't Want Your Broken Toaster

New Hampshire Public Radio

Americans have been trained not to throw anything away, but not schooled in how to get rid of items properly. And so "wish-cyclers" are donating millions of pounds of broken goods and trash to Goodwill.

Goodwill Doesn't Want Your Broken Toaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993821945/994376838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Recycle art activist" Thomas Dambo makes these gentle giants from scrap wood, old pallets, twigs and debris. Above, Marit in It Sounded Like a Mountain Fell in Wulong, China. Jacob Keinicke/Thomas Dambo hide caption

toggle caption
Jacob Keinicke/Thomas Dambo

Far From The Internet, These Big, Benevolent Trolls Lure Humans To Nature

"Recycle art activist" Thomas Dambo makes these gentle giants out of scrap wood, old pallets, twigs and debris. Dozens of them now preside over mountains, forests and parks around the world.

Feelings of exhaustion, irritability and mental fogginess are our bodies' normal response to an abnormal year of pandemic life. Wenjin Chen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wenjin Chen/Getty Images

If Your Brain Feels Foggy And You're Tired All The Time, You're Not Alone

The pandemic has done a number on us, in too many ways to count. Our bodies are responding with feelings of fatigue and lack of focus, experts say. Here are some tips to help you feel better.

If Your Brain Feels Foggy And You're Tired All The Time, You're Not Alone

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/992401123/993099405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from